Upstate Health

Welcome to Upstate Health, a magazine produced by Upstate Medical University to inspire healthy living. You will find stories about medical care and wellness, of course, but also a variety of articles that pertain to life in Central New York. Our experts share advice on caregiving, food and leisure activities in every issue.

Scroll below, and click on any issue to view a full electronic version.

Have you got a story idea? Want a free subscription, or extra copies for your office? Contact us at whatsup@upstate.edu or by calling 315-464-4836.

Spring 2014

springhealthThis issue contains information and inspiration. Read about the expansion of Upstate’s sleep center, the only one in this region with services that accommodate children as young as infants. Meet a former trauma patient who shares his ordeal, and his gratitude that Upstate has achieved national verification from the American College of Surgeons.

Our pages give reason to cheer: for the courageous mother battling breast cancer; for the stroke survivor who is almost fully recovered, for the Special Olympian who loves floor hockey — and for four runners from Upstate who won the right to compete in the Corporate Challenge in London this year.

You will also find important information from our experts about a dangerous drug that is hospitalizing and killing people in our community, advice on making a home “senior safe” and the latest news about the impact of coital lubricants on a couple’s chances of conception.

Enjoy your Health, brought to you by Upstate!

Winter 2014

Layout 1A physical therapist offers encouragement, along with her therapy session.  A surgeon offers hope to a patient who wants to be able to walk. A professor offers enthusiasm for science. Upstate Medical University is academic medicine at its best. We care for patients with a range of health issues from routine to complex. We train tomorrow’s healthcare providers, and we conduct research that may lead to the cures of the future.

This year as we celebrate 50 years (p. 17) our hospitals welcome a dynamic electronic medical records system called Epic that wasn’t even dreamed of 50 years ago. It will organize patient care documentation and allow patients access to much of their health information. Even as Epic illustrates technical advances, we are mindful to maintain the human touch (p. 14) and our important role in Central New York community.

Three examples in this issue:

  • the physician who prescribes ballet to improve the lives of her patients with cerebral palsy, (p. 6,)
  • the scientist who helps us understand how smoking addictions affect babies in utero, (p. 11,)
  • the staff who volunteer on Onondaga County’s Search & Rescue Team, (p. 15.)

We hope you enjoy your Health, brought to you by Upstate.

Need a referral or more information?

Contact Upstate Connect at 315-464-8668 or 1-800-464-8668, day or night, for appointments or referrals to the health care providers on these pages or anywhere at Upstate — or for questions on any health topic.

covershotFall 2013

In recent months the Syracuse skyline has seen a dominant new structure rising. Hundreds of construction workers have played integral roles in creating the new home for the only place in Central New York that provides cancer care for people of all ages. The Upstate Cancer Center is scheduled to be ready for patients next year. Syracuse has also gained new laboratory and workspace for scientists and entrepreneurs in the opening of Upstate’s Neurosciences Research Building and the Central New York Biotech Accelerator.

These projects and others represent nearly $1 billion in new construction, providing modern new space for patient care, research and ongoing education, the core components of Upstate’s mission.

On these pages you’ll find coverage of that mission in stories about advanced medical care for stroke, concussion and trigeminal neuralgia. You’ll find a very personal story about a prominent surgeon, incoming Onondaga County Medical Society president, Dr. David Halleran, MD whose family has a strong history of pancreatic cancer.

You will also read about an innovative way doctors are learning communication skills, the advice one mother offers about parenting when you have cancer, and a dietitian’s explanation of the benefits of fiber.

From the research realm are stories about studies involving Upstate professionals on post-traumatic stress disorder, improving immunization rates, the ill effects of party drugs, the value of social workers and understanding schizophrenia.

We share stories about a medical mission to Ghana, and passions for soccer, car racing and reading in our leisure section. As a reminder that laughter is the best medicine, don’t forget The Humorist, Jeff Kramer, who recently spent some time as a patient in the emergency department of Upstate University Hospital.

summercoverSummer 2013

Mother/daughter nurses are on the cover of this issue of Upstate Health. Read how heart surgery as a child inspired Megan Havener, RN into a career in nursing. She and her mother both work at Upstate.

We’ve got a couple of other stories in our Patient’s First section — one about a student who became a stroke patient, and another about a brain tumor patient who became a student, and then an employee.

If ever you have wondered, “what is Upstate?” our collection of nostalgia starting on page 11 will go a long way toward answering that question. The academic medical center in Syracuse has a rich and interesting history that continues to influence our mission today. We train doctors and nurses and other health professionals, and we also provide vital medical care and conduct a variety of research endeavors.

Our campus houses some of the most respected experts in the Central New York region – and starting with this issue, Upstate Health is tapping their knowledge to answer your questions. We aren’t giving personal medical advice. For that, you’ll need an appointment. (Call 1-800-464-8668 for referrals.) Instead, our health care providers and scientists will field general questions, such as those on page 16: Does blood type change after a stem cell transplant?

Between issues of “Upstate Health,” stay in touch with us on Facebook or by subscribing to the “What’s Up at Upstate” blog at www.upstate.edu/whatsup You can also tune in to “HealthLink on Air,” Upstate’s weekly radio talk show, from 9 to 10 p.m. Sundays on WRVO Public Media, part of National Public Radio.

Enjoy your Health, brought to you by Upstate.

wintermagWinter 2013

Olamide Ajagbe MD took a quick break from her shift at Upstate Golisano After Hours Care, at Upstate’s Community Campus, to be photographed for this issue of Upstate Health. You’ll find a story about this service that began in 2012, providing care for pediatric patients up to age 21.

Also in this issue you’ll notice several articles marked with radio microphones. For these subjects (and many others) you can listen to a complete interview on line at www.upstate.edu/healthlinkonair.

We’ve got stories about “Wizard of Oz” author L. Frank Baum, the new Impella heart pump that helps high-risk patients, a teenager who is grateful for the stem cell transplant he underwent as a preschooler, and a respiratory therapy student who is into scuba diving. You’ll also get to meet Mark Torres, a hospital systems engineer, Juntao Luo PhD, a cancer researcher, and Thomas Kiernan, the top chef at University Hospital.

Upstate Health Fall 2012Fall 2012

Emergency physician Jeremy Joslin MD is featured on the cover of the Fall 2012 issue of Upstate Health, in front of the EMS & Disaster Medicine Physician Response Teams’ white Ford Expedition.

The issue includes an amazing story of stroke survival, five inspiring kidney donations and a look at the dangers of distracted driving. There is also a story that tells you everything you need to know about hepatitis C, and another that explains when (and when not) to have a medical scan.

Should research include people with developmental disabilities? That’s the question addressed in “The Upstate Ethicist” feature. Have you read Dr. Abraham Verghese’s  “Cutting for Stone?” That’s the book recommended in the “Good Read” feature.

You’ll meet clinical toxicologist Alexander Garrard on page 16, respiratory therapist Kristina Sherman on page 19, eight Upstate triathletes on pages 20 and 21, and executive sous chef Bill Gokey on page 17 — along with his Strawberry, Chicken and Fennel Salad.

Our back page is a showcase for work from the lab f Jeffrey Amack PhD and graduate student Yongchang Ji. And don’t forget to check out the cover story, on page 15, about Joslin and the other Upstate physicians who respond to disasters throughout the community.

UH3Spring 2012

Psychologist Dr. Rich O’Neill PhD has the cover for Spring 2012. A bicycle enthusiast, he pedals to work, including to the Health Link on Air studio every week where he records “Check Up from the Neck Up.” Upstate’s talk radio show airs from 9 to 10 a.m. Sundays on WSYR.

This issue includes information about pediatric sleep disorders, a radioembolization procedure that targets liver tumors, and stroke care at Upstate University Hospital. You’ll read about a study of hand hygiene among Adirondack hikers, a do-it-yourself thyroid check and why removing polyps can reduce the number of cancer deaths.

Meet a carpenter who turned a black walnut tree into a commemorative table, an information technologist known as the “Restore King” of Upstate, three faculty members who are avid bicyclists, and a man who fishes four times a week, year round.

We also explain how (and why) to make an anatomical gift to the medical school and provide a look under the microscope of Peter Calvert PhD.

UH2Winter 2012

Father/son cancer specialists are featured on the Winter 2012 cover. That’s Michael Poiesz MD with his father, Bernie Poiesz MD and their Irish setters, Beacon and Finnegan. Read how they strike a work/life balance on page 14.

In this issue, look for stories about a construction engineer who has a loved one on his mind as he works on the new Upstate Cancer Center, a teenager treated for a rare brain tumor, and a new method of caring for severe frostbite. Kaushal Nanavati MD walks us through five strategies for treating headaches. Trauma coordinator Steve Adkisson provides a simple visualization to help prevent injuries. James Alexander MD explains what to do about heavy menstruation.

A speech language pathologist, clinical dietitian and speech therapist team up to provide advice on feeding someone with a swallowing difficulty. Two bariatric surgeons lay out the options for weight loss surgery. And a pediatrician tells how adolescents are like astronauts.

You’ll meet a man who runs ultramarathons, a woman who is a 3rd-degree black belt in karate, a contracts administrator who loves reading the classics and a man who skis all winter with his family. On the back page, you’ll get a peek into the laboratory of Mira Krendel PhD, an assistant professor of Cell and Developmental Biology.

UH1Fall 2011

The cover of the inaugural issue of Upstate Health features Zulma Tovar-Spinoza MD with one of her patients, Lily Craparo. Their story begins on page 4.

There are additional stories about narcissism (the official diagnosis of which is fading,) wound care (which is of great importance to those with diabetes) and how to bathe an elderly loved one. You’ll also get an up-close look at the da Vinci surgical robot, learn about a germ-free alternative to hand shakes and discover the musical gifts shared by many medical students.

Upstate’s Department of Pediatrics chairman shares three great hikes, and Christopher Turner PhD and Nicholas Deakin PhD share a view from their laboratory, where they study how cancer spreads.

One Response to Upstate Health

  1. Pingback: Wow — lots of cool research, therapy takes place here at Upstate | What's Up at Upstate

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