Science Is Art: Prostate cancer cells under the microscope

Prostate cancer cells. (FROM THE LABORATORY OF LESZEK KOTULA, MD, PhD)

Prostate cancer cells. (FROM THE LABORATORY OF LESZEK KOTULA, MD, PhD)

If doctors could tell which tumors would remain indolent and which would become invasive, they could better treat men with prostate cancer. About 3 percent of men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer have an aggressive type, shown in the images above from the laboratory of associate professor Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD.

Kotula, together with doctoral student Disharee Das, focuses on a gene he discovered two decades ago called Abi1, which causes prostate cancer. They want to learn how it interacts with other genes and whether it plays a role in leukemias and breast, ovarian and other cancers.

Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD, standing, with doctoral student Disharee Das. (PHOTO BY SUSAN KEETER)

Leszek Kotula, MD, PhD, standing, with doctoral student Disharee Das. (PHOTO BY SUSAN KEETER)

Upstate Health magazine winter 2018 issueThis article appears in the winter 2018 issue of Upstate Health magazine. For more on the Abi1 gene and Kotula’s prostate cancer research, click here.

This entry was posted in cancer, health care, men's health, research. Bookmark the permalink.